Stories

In 2023 England’s National Health Service (NHS) responded to public pressure by finally recognising chronic urinary tract infection (UTI) as a distinct condition requiring specialist diagnosis and treatment. The development could pave the way for patient advocates in Australia and other countries who are campaigning their own authorities for major improvements to UTI guidelines.

A common urinary tract infection left Danielle with chronic symptoms that doctors misdiagnosed as interstitial cystitis (IC)—an incurable, yet questionable, urinary syndrome that is now under heavy scrutiny.  Once she found a doctor who understood her condition, she began a treatment that targeted her infection.  Read more about Danielle's story.

Carly was 21 when she had her first UTI.  She was treated with antibiotics and a week later her symptoms were back.  This pattern continued. Her doctor believed each episode was a new infection but she wasn't so sure.  She decided to take to the internet to learn more.  She first heard about Hiprex when reading through some chronic UTI websites and decided to buy some and give it a go.  After 10 months taking Hiprex daily, along with a three-month trial on antibiotics, she feels completely well and is excited to be planning her wedding.

 

After frequent international travel for work, Julie developed a series of complex symptoms that were badly impacting her health.  Her symptoms were put down to an auto-immune condition that she had to live with.  Six years on she developed further symptoms – this time relating to her bladder.  Her doctors explored and treated several problems that were identified, but her bladder symptoms persisted.  After eight years of managing bladder pain and incapacitating reduced capacity and frequency, and undergoing various disappointing treatments, she decided to use her academic skills to find a proper solution.  She consulted with an Australian urologist who recommended she read 'Cystitis Unmasked' by the late Professor James Malone-Lee. They both agreed she would trial a treatment for chronic bladder infections.  Within weeks, Julie's bladder symptoms started to vanish and her life finally took to a turn for the better.  Read more about Julie's journey to reclaim her health.

Jean shared her story with us in May 2019.  After menopause things had started to go wrong.  Among her worries, Jean had developed UTI symptoms but her urine tests kept coming back negative and she was prescribed antidepressants to deal with her increasing anxiety.  She refused to accept her problems were psychological and she continued to search for answers.  Eventually she was diagnosed and treated for a chronic UTI.  Jean found Hiprex and Chinese herbs was the answer for her and she improved in leaps and bounds.  Three years after completing her combination treatment, Jean remains happy and well.  Read Jean's updated story.

Elizabeth was struck with gastroenteritis while holidaying in Hawaii. Within days she had also developed a urinary tract infection (UTI) and was treated with antibiotics.   She responded well to the treatment but several weeks later some mild urinary symptoms returned.  Although the subsequent test from the lab was positive for a UTI, she was not informed and did not receive the necessary follow-up treatment.  Her UTI symptoms continued to get worse and by now her urine tests were negative.  This is when she was told she had interstitial cystitis (IC).  Elizabeth could not get past the feeling that her UTI in Hawaii had never fully cleared. Although her doctors insisted she was wrong and there was no infection, she was determined to find the answers she needed to get better.  Read more about Elizabeth's chronic UTI story here.

When Samantha felt a urinary tract infection (UTI) come on, a negative test at the Emergency Department sent her on a pathway she never expected. In no time she was diagnosed with interstitial cystitis (IC) and she underwent repeated procedures and trialled a huge variety of medications that did nothing to stop her bladder symptoms becoming worse.  When she exhausted all options offered by her doctors, she turned to an online group for emotional support.  When she heard about chronic UTI and the diagnostic failures of UTI dipstick and culture tests, she instinctively knew this was what she had been going through for the past six years and sought the advice of a doctor who knew how to diagnose and treat chronic UTI.  With endometriosis, an ovary cyst and pudendal neuralgia having also been diagnosed, she took a multi-faceted approach to her treatment. Nine months in, Samantha is relieved to feel normal again and she has become passionate about encouraging people with confusing health conditions to find the strength and support to advocate for their own health.