natural remedies Tag

Naomi is a young Canadian woman who experienced her first UTI at the age of 19.  Following typical antibiotic  treatment, she was left with vague UTI symptoms that became an unwelcome daily companion.  Within the following year, her symptoms gradually escalated into bi-monthly acute UTI attacks.   Naomi's doctor found an antibiotic solution that quickly brought her infections under control, but she was unsure how to stop the recurrent UTIs from striking at random and dominating her life.  While being treated by a popular Calgary acupuncturist for unrelated back pain, the practitioner suggested acupuncture might help her recurrent UTIs as well.  Naomi, now aged 29, felt she had nothing to lose and started acupuncture treatment targeting her urinary tract in January 2019.  She reports she has not had an acute UTI, or required antibiotics, in almost a year.  You can read more about Naomi's acupuncture experience here.

When Jean started having 'women's issues' after menopause, she had no idea a UTI would send her health into such decline.  Repeat negative UTI tests misled her doctors into thinking there was no infection and she was prescribed antidepressants to deal with her growing state of panic.  In a determined effort to find better answers, she was relieved to be diagnosed with a chronic UTI and was immediately started on treatment.  She soon discovered a combination of a urinary antiseptic and Chinese herbal medicine was her answer.  Jean is convinced chronic UTI is a multi-faceted condition that requires an approach to heal the body, mind and soul.   Read more about how Jean healed her chronic UTI and reclaimed her life.

 

Sarah is an American woman whose UTI problems started in her teens.  Antibiotics worked well at the beginning, but overtime the infections persisted and the treatment no longer worked as it once did.  When her UTI tests started to show negative for infection, her doctors offered medication for her building anxiety instead.  A urogynaecologist was able to keep her symptoms under control, but strong side effects from the medication left her feeling awful.  Looking for a more natural solution to her bladder symptoms, she found a new healthy lifestyle offered more than just relief from her relentless bladder symptoms.  Not only was she noticing her bladder feeling better, she was feeling better all over.   Read more about Sarah's recovery here.

 

The festive season is usually a time for love, happiness, fun, family, friends and food.  When it comes to someone with a chronic UTI, it can also be the season for unwelcome UTI flare-ups.  Flares occur when bacteria embedded in the bladder wall become active (planktonic) and start to multiply in the urine, resulting in increased symptoms.  Flare-ups can be triggered by a variety of thingsthe most commonly reported being stress (good and bad), sex, vigorous exercise, internal gynaecological procedures, bowel movements, drinking alcohol and consuming certain foods that individuals are sensitive to.  Christmastime should be added to the list because it seems to be an extremely common time to experience flares, no matter where you live in the world. To help minimise the risk of a flare-up ruining your holidays, we asked people with chronic UTI to share their best prevention tips.  This is what they told us.

 

Jenny is a young Italian woman who was suddenly struck with a streptococcus infection causing acute bladder and vaginal pain and burning.  Despite being treated, and tests confirming the infection had cleared, her symptoms worsened and her health was in decline.  After a year she was diagnosed with vulvodynia and fibromyalgia and prescribed a treatment that took the edge off her symptoms.  Feeling despair and let down by standard medical treatments that left her still extremely unwell, she turned to a dietician who introduced her to a natural approach to healing systemic body inflammation and strengthen the immune system.   A year on, Jenny no longer suffers her dreadful symptoms and is back to leading a normal life.  You can read more about Jenny's experience here.

 

Life changed for this Australian woman when a simple, uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) refused to go away. Relying solely on tests results, doctors were quick to disassociate her symptoms from the initial infection and diagnose her with interstitial cystitis (IC).  Following a post-operative course of antibiotics, Jenna had an unbelievable 14 year hiatus before her dreaded symptoms returned.  Realising doctors knew very little about her condition, she  decided she would find a way to get better.  Her ongoing research highlighted similarities between her 'incurable' condition and other chronic infections.  After plenty of reading and research, she decided to trial a treatment protocol used to target pathogens linked with several other conditions.  This unconventional, self-administered protocol quickly led to relief from her ongoing urinary symptoms.  In little over a year, Jenna was able to stop her treatment completely and remain symptom-free.  You can read more about Jenna's experience here.

 

Jill began experiencing recurrent UTIs when she was 60.  Despite receiving standard antibiotic treatment for these acute attacks, the frequency of her infections soon increased, along with alarming lab findings of growing antibiotic resistances.  After suffering severe gut problems from candida overgrowth, and with labs now consistently finding a resistant ESBL-producing E coli (ESBL-EC), she turned to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and completely turned her life around.   Jill has been free from recurrent UTIs for three years and has now turned her attention to lobbying for change.  In 2016 she established a campaign group, BladderAction UK.  The group is putting pressure on the UK government and relevant authorities to address current failures in the medical system, and to introduce better UTI testing and treatment protocols in the UK.   Here is Jill’s story.

 

The following blog entry is a patient story from an Australian woman with a five year history of recurrent UTIs that turned into a diagnosis of 'irritable bladder' and 'interstitial cystitis'. In desperation, she took matters into her own hands and cured her chronic UTI naturally through improving her overall health,  balancing her hormones and taking natural anti-microbials.  Her personal journey has resulted in a research project collecting information from women who have managed, treated and cured their recurrent UTIs.  She has now developed a website designed to share this valuable information which she hopes will help educate and empower other women.