recurrent UTI Tag

Linda had bladder issues for as long as she can remember.  Even as a child she was aware she needed the bathroom more than most.  It was inconvenient and sometimes embarrassing, but she developed strategies to manage social events without drawing too much attention to her toilet trips.  It was after menopause that her bladder symptoms escalated and her strategies and short-course antibiotics stopped working.  Linda did some research and asked her GP to refer her to a clinic specialising in chronic UTI and other bladder conditions.  At her first appointment she was diagnosed with a chronic UTI and she has never looked back.  Read how Linda went from an entire lifetime managing a troublesome 'weak bladder' to living a fulfilling, fully productive and happy life.

 

Diane started to get recurrent UTIs several years after surgery for urinary incontinence using transvaginal tape (TVT).  The surgery was successful but for a time she needed a catheter to empty her bladder.  After a routine colonoscopy and stopping hormone replacement therapy (HRT), a tsunami of UTIs soon followed.  After completing a short course of antibiotics, her infection returned without fail.  This happened time and again and she was having UTIs monthly.  She learned about chronic UTI through an online support group and asked her urologist to trial her with an evidence-based treatment protocol for chronic UTI used in the United Kingdom.  With continuous, full dose antibiotics for six months, she is thrilled to report she has been UTI and symptom free for two years.  Read more about Diane's story here.

 

Kyla's recurrent UTI began in her late teens.  The infections were so regular and persistent that it completely dominated her 20s.  Each time she had sex she would end up with a UTI and in acute pain at the hospital emergency department.  She was so ill dealing with a UTI, or getting over one, that she missed out on socialising with her friends and having fun—instead she was often home in bed wondering what her future held.  She was referred to specialists who ordered all types of bladder tests and procedures.  Nothing worked and she was discharged back to the care of her general practitioner (GP).  The GP referred her to another UTI specialist, but this time was different.  The specialist diagnosed her with a chronic UTI and started a treatment protocol that turned her life around.  Her improvement has been slow and bumpy, but after seven years she is living a normal life and is sure she will be off her treatment very soon.  Read more about Kyla's story and her tips for others like her.

 

Laura's experience with urinary tract infections (UTIs) was limited.  She'd only had two UTIs before, but her third was different.  It did not fully respond to antibiotics and her symptoms returned within days to weeks after each prescribed treatment.   She went through the usual process of referrals and investigative tests and found no answers.  After reading information online about chronic UTI, she knew instantly this is what she had.  She met with a new GP who thought it was likely she had a chronic UTI and agreed to treat her.  Months into her new treatment regimen, Laura had a video consult with a leading chronic UTI doctor in London and they decided upon working with her existing GP to continue her treatment.  Nine months in, Laura is almost back to her old self and is looking forward to finishing her treatment.  You can read more about Laura's success below.

 

Michele developed a septic UTI at the age of 21.  This was the start of nearly three decades of recurrent UTIs, persistent UTI symptoms, negative tests, positive tests, doctors' appointment, invasive procedures and much ongoing pain and suffering for her.  When she was searching online for explanations for her mysterious condition, Michele came across an online support group for people with embedded, chronic UTIs.  This was an important turning point that led her to find other women who were being treated by a chronic UTI specialist in the United Kingdom and, a little later, another based in the United States.  Michele consulted with both doctors in person.  With just over a year of treatment, she can now lead a normal life and says she hasn't felt this good in years.  Read more about Michele's chronic UTI story.

Coby was familiar with having the occasional acute UTI, just like many of her female friends.  She started to worry though when her recurrent UTIs increased in frequency.  Just weeks after completing a prophylactic course of antibiotics, she developed a serious kidney infection.  Reluctant to be stuck in a never ending cycle of pain and back-to-back short course antibiotics, she was determined to find a different approach to stop her infections.  When her urologist mentioned other patients reported good results with D-mannose, she decided to give it a try.   Within six months her recurrent UTIs were gone.  Almost seven years on, she feels confident and empowered that the treatment she stumbled upon has broken her recurrent UTI cycle for good. She realises not everyone with recurrent and chronic UTI has the same success with  D-mannose, but she wants to reach as many people as she can in the hope it works for others as well as it has worked for her.   You can read more about Coby's experience with D-mannose here, along with a link to her information website.

At the age of five or six, Bella knew there was something different about her.  Her bladder often hurt and she could not control the urgent need to race to the toilet frequently.  This led to 'accidents', unsympathetic teachers, teasing kids and doctors who misunderstood the cause and the severity of her condition.  Her unrelenting urinary symptoms had shaped her entire life.  In her early 20s, her symptoms had become markedly worse.  Newly married and with the encouragement and support of her husband, she flew to the United Kingdom to attend a chronic UTI clinic.  To her relief, she was diagnosed and treated for a UTI that had plagued her for her entire life.  After five months of constant antibiotic treatment, Bella cannot believe how much her symptoms have reduced and how good she feels for the first time.   Now that she is receiving a treatment designed specifically for her condition, she knows she will be fully cured in time.  She is looking forward to living a normal life and she is excited that some day she and her husband will start a family—something she feared might never happen.  Read Bella's story here.

Dr Nicky Thomas is a Senior Research Fellow at University of South Australia and The Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Health Research, where he works on developing nanomedicines to treat infections that have become resistant to traditional antimicrobial therapies.   Among other concerning and challenging chronic bacterial infections, Dr Thomas' team has an interest in improving the delivery and efficacy of antibiotics in people suffering chronic urinary  tract infections (UTI).

 

Naomi is a young Canadian woman who experienced her first UTI at the age of 19.  Following typical antibiotic  treatment, she was left with vague UTI symptoms that became an unwelcome daily companion.  Within the following year, her symptoms gradually escalated into bi-monthly acute UTI attacks.   Naomi's doctor found an antibiotic solution that quickly brought her infections under control, but she was unsure how to stop the recurrent UTIs from striking at random and dominating her life.  While being treated by a popular Calgary acupuncturist for unrelated back pain, the practitioner suggested acupuncture might help her recurrent UTIs as well.  Naomi, now aged 29, felt she had nothing to lose and started acupuncture treatment targeting her urinary tract in January 2019.  She reports she has not had an acute UTI, or required antibiotics, in almost a year.  You can read more about Naomi's acupuncture experience here.

In 2008 America went to the doctor for a urinary tract infection (UTI).  She was treated, but her infection came back after each course of treatment.  This went on for several months.  Her confused doctor referred her to a urologist, where she was diagnosed at the first appointment with interstitial cystitis (IC).  For five years she was treated with a cocktail of medication to help manage her symptoms, but this did little more than take the edge of her pain and caused woeful side effects.  America chanced upon information about a UTI specialist in the United Kingdom who specifically treats people like her who have been diagnosed with urinary syndromes and recurrent UTIs.  America decided she had nothing to lose and set off across the Atlantic for a consultation.   With the approval of her new doctor, she stopped her IC medication and started her new treatment.    Ten months in, she claims to feel the best she has in 10 years.  She still has some symptoms, but only rarely notices them.  After a decade of pain, despair and depression, fighting off symptoms and dealing with significant medication side-effects, she now feels she can refocus on her work, her relationship with her husband and children and her future.   America's thrilled to have her life back on track.