urinary tract infection Tag

A common urinary tract infection left Danielle with chronic symptoms that doctors misdiagnosed as interstitial cystitis (IC)—an incurable, yet questionable, urinary syndrome that is now under heavy scrutiny.  Once she found a doctor who understood her condition, she began a treatment that targeted her infection.  Read more about Danielle's story.

 

Carly was 21 when she had her first UTI.  She was treated with antibiotics and a week later her symptoms were back.  This pattern continued. Her doctor believed each episode was a new infection but she wasn't so sure.  She decided to take to the internet to learn more.  She first heard about Hiprex when reading through some chronic UTI websites and decided to buy some and give it a go.  After 10 months taking Hiprex daily, along with a three-month trial on antibiotics, she feels completely well and is excited to be planning her wedding.

 

After frequent international travel for work, Julie developed a series of complex symptoms that were badly impacting her health.  Her symptoms were put down to an auto-immune condition that she had to live with.  Six years on she developed further symptoms – this time relating to her bladder.  Her doctors explored and treated several problems that were identified, but her bladder symptoms persisted.  After eight years of managing bladder pain and incapacitating reduced capacity and frequency, and undergoing various disappointing treatments, she decided to use her academic skills to find a proper solution.  She consulted with an Australian urologist who recommended she read 'Cystitis Unmasked' by the late Professor James Malone-Lee. They both agreed she would trial a treatment for chronic bladder infections.  Within weeks, Julie's bladder symptoms started to vanish and her life finally took to a turn for the better.  Read more about Julie's journey to reclaim her health.

 

Online information and support groups can be great places to link with others who are in a similar situation. This can help reduce feelings of isolation often experienced by people suffering silently with persistent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).  Online groups allow for the sharing of information and personal experiences and are good places to access support—or to support others. We had a chat with the administrators of the Chronic and Recurrent UTI Support Group (Australia and New Zealand)—a Facebook group focused on science-based discussions around diagnosis and treatment for chronic UTI. The group has a strong emphasis on exploring solutions to overcome the challenges of accessing treatment in our region.  Online support groups are not for everyone but they can play a helpful role for many people who are seeking information and support.

 

Elizabeth was struck with gastroenteritis while holidaying in Hawaii. Within days she had also developed a urinary tract infection (UTI) and was treated with antibiotics.   She responded well to the treatment but several weeks later some mild urinary symptoms returned.  Although the subsequent test from the lab was positive for a UTI, she was not informed and did not receive the necessary follow-up treatment.  Her UTI symptoms continued to get worse and by now her urine tests were negative.  This is when she was told she had interstitial cystitis (IC).  Elizabeth could not get past the feeling that her UTI in Hawaii had never fully cleared. Although her doctors insisted she was wrong and there was no infection, she was determined to find the answers she needed to get better.  Read more about Elizabeth's chronic UTI story here.

When Samantha felt a urinary tract infection (UTI) come on, a negative test at the Emergency Department sent her on a pathway she never expected. In no time she was diagnosed with interstitial cystitis (IC) and she underwent repeated procedures and trialled a huge variety of medications that did nothing to stop her bladder symptoms becoming worse.  When she exhausted all options offered by her doctors, she turned to an online group for emotional support.  When she heard about chronic UTI and the diagnostic failures of UTI dipstick and culture tests, she instinctively knew this was what she had been going through for the past six years and sought the advice of a doctor who knew how to diagnose and treat chronic UTI.  With endometriosis, an ovary cyst and pudendal neuralgia having also been diagnosed, she took a multi-faceted approach to her treatment. Nine months in, Samantha is relieved to feel normal again and she has become passionate about encouraging people with confusing health conditions to find the strength and support to advocate for their own health.

 

We are thrilled to release our 2021 Australian-exclusive interview with Professor James Malone-Lee discussing chronic urinary tract infection (UTI).  Professor Malone-Lee has nearly four decades of experience researching UTI and treating thousands of patients with bladder conditions.  He shares information from his book Cystitis Unmasked in response to questions from an all-Australian panel featuring urologist Dr Anita Clarke, pelvic physiotherapist Alyssa Tait, chronic UTI patient representative Melinda Brown and Chronic UTI Australia's chairperson, Imelda Wilde.  Read more below from Imelda about the interview.

Linda had bladder issues for as long as she can remember.  Even as a child she was aware she needed the bathroom more than most.  It was inconvenient and sometimes embarrassing, but she developed strategies to manage social events without drawing too much attention to her toilet trips.  It was after menopause that her bladder symptoms escalated and her strategies and short-course antibiotics stopped working.  Linda did some research and asked her GP to refer her to a clinic specialising in chronic UTI and other bladder conditions.  At her first appointment she was diagnosed with a chronic UTI and she has never looked back.  Read how Linda went from an entire lifetime managing a troublesome 'weak bladder' to living a fulfilling, fully productive and happy life.

 

Chronic UTI Australia will shortly launch ‘Hearing Patient Voices’—a confidential online survey of people who have been diagnosed with a chronic urinary tract infection (UTI) or who suspect they have a chronic UTI.  The survey is designed to capture the quality of life impacts of the condition on various domains of life and is open to people from all countries.  Participating in this survey will strengthen our understanding of patients' experiences and contribute greatly to our work in raising awareness and recognition of chronic UTI among health professionals and policy makers.  Read more about the 'Hearing Patient Voices' survey here.

Diane started to get recurrent UTIs several years after surgery for urinary incontinence using transvaginal tape (TVT).  The surgery was successful but for a time she needed a catheter to empty her bladder.  After a routine colonoscopy and stopping hormone replacement therapy (HRT), a tsunami of UTIs soon followed.  After completing a short course of antibiotics, her infection returned without fail.  This happened time and again and she was having UTIs monthly.  She learned about chronic UTI through an online support group and asked her urologist to trial her with an evidence-based treatment protocol for chronic UTI used in the United Kingdom.  With continuous, full dose antibiotics for six months, she is thrilled to report she has been UTI and symptom free for two years.  Read more about Diane's story here.